re-using, recycling, and redeeming old wood

Posts tagged “carving

155. Lynn Doughty: a carver worth knowing.

Lynn Doughty is a carver I enjoy following. Here you get just three of his more recent, fine pieces. He has many useful and interesting techniques he willingly shares on his site listed below. Hope you can check him out. Well worth your time.

http://outwestwoodcarving.blogspot.com/

Shalom.

“Everyone enjoys a fitting reply; it is wonderful to say the right thing at the right time!” Prov 15:23.

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153. Other material: Eggshell Carvings. | Frankie965

Recycling? Perhaps here pushed to the limit. Hope you can enjoy someone’s creativity as much as I do. A few pictures of Brian’s eggshells may hook you into something new.

Eggshell Carvings. | Frankie965.

“So by using high-speed device called paragraver (something like a dental instrument),

Brian Bate creates masterpieces of incredible beauty, from the simple egg.”

Shalom.

“Better a little with righteousness than much gain with injustice.” Prov 16:8


142. Carving ideas. Crayons as carving material.

How cool is this? “Inspired by folk art, wood carvings and childhood memories, Artist Diem Chau carved a pack of crayola crayons into the 12 signs of the Chinese zodiac. Pretty impressive!”

So now you never have an excuse to be without carving material. There has to be a crayon or two somewhere around. Diem Chau and others have given you something to shoot for.

Shalom.

“It is to one’s honor to avoid strife, but every fool is quick to quarrel.” Prov 20:3


141. Carving idea. Famous Faces Carved In Phone Books.

Always looking for different ways to s one is interesting too. There is much to learn about carving in es, special tools, corrections and goof recovery among them. Have you tried it?

Shalom.

“A person’s wisdom yields patience; it is to one’s glory to overlook an offense. Prov 19:11

Alex Queral  http://www.projectsgallery.com/Queral.htm

Famous Faces Carved Out of Phone Books.


103 Revisited: Post 83

2012-03-14 05.49.07

Of course, you are asking yourself what this photo is all about.  Well, if you haven’t skipped to the bottom and looked through the gallery yet, it is a mouth full of teeth.  Not my original idea, I found it in one of the myriad of carving magazines lying around my carving space.  This is a final post of a project shown earlier in 83 Big mouth 1 and 2.  This is Big mouth 2 painted.

2012-03-14 05.48.45

I didn’t want to make all the pictures large, but I thought at least these two would make a nice showing, giving the full effect of the piece.  I really like the strong white on the teeth.  It is acrylic white at full strength.  I do like the softer blue for a hint of a hat and the natural red or umber of the unpainted wood for the face.  Every piece teaches something for the next time.  On this piece I would paint the gums a stronger red. Without it, there is some confusion about where the gum is and where the lip begins.  Having said that, the piece is fun.  Anyone interested in buying it?  We can talk.

Shalom,

“Desire without knowledge is not good—how much more will hasty feet miss the way! ” Proverbs 18


98 Whale ho!

Stylized blue whale

Stylized blue whale

Do any of you remember a childhood book entitled, “Burt Dow, Deep Water Man”?  Author Robert McCloskey (http://www.robertmccloskeymemoir.com/) wrote about an east coast deep sea fisherman named Burt who ends up inside a whale in a gale.  The story begins with Burt hooking a whooper, a whale.  His tiny boat can’t hold the whale, so Burt removes his hook and patches the whales tail with colorful bandage.  The story ends with Burt placing a colorful band-aid on the tails an entire pod of whales.  You will have to read it to find out about the gale and the whale.

Acrylic wash over cedar finished with boiled linseed oil.

Acrylic wash over cedar finished with boiled linseed oil.

Of course, these photos are not part of Burt Dow’s story, but the whale here reminds me of McCloskey’s whales.  And certainly this whale, with the notch out of one side and a knot in the other side of his tail might be able to use one of Burt’s bandages, or two or three.

image

Cedar wood grain comes through in interesting ways.

But of course, this whale could be as friendly and helpful as any of the whales in McCloskey’s story.

image

Smile

I think the smile on this guy comes across really well.  Of course, whales don’t smile, but if they did, this is what they would look like.

Cedar wood whale on lake driftwood.

Cedar wood whale on lake driftwood.

So, another whale.  This one came out beautifully.  While cedar is not the easiest wood to work with, an acrylic wash has allowed the cedar wood grain to pour through adding another dimension of texture to the piece.  The whale is a stylized blue whale.  The piece about 12 x x 4 without the base.

The base is a piece of lake drift wood.  Some color has been added to give the feel of ocean floor.  The colors seem a bit intense in these photos, but when the piece is sitting on a counter or mantel the colors come through more subtly.  The mounting, at angle, gives the piece a little more movement.  I really like the last picture.  The shadow and light make for a happy face.

This whale is now part of the collection of Mr. Rick Buteyn.

Shalom.

“It is not good to be partial to the wicked and so deprive the innocent of justice.”  Proverbs 18:5


96 Gifts to friends part one

Golfer 26 2013

“The Retired Golfer”  in the collection of Mr. Ron Holwerda

One of the great joys of wood carving is the opportunity to share carvings with others.  Last June two of my good friends and colleagues retired from teaching.  Ron was my principal and Milt was the teacher in the room next door to me.  I worked with them for 21 years.  We had a great working relationship.  And we got to know each other.

Golf is one of Ron’s passions.  I am sure he can find time for a few rounds now.  So it seemed appropriate to carve a golfer.  The design is not my own, the workmanship is.  I included a bunch of thumbnail views so you would get the full effect.  I am curious to know how well they show  up for you.  It is the first time I have used the thumbnail feature.

The figure is bass wood.  The base is a cutoff from a black walnut branch.  Acrylic paint and boiled linseed oil are the main part of the finish.  I learned from Tom Wolfe to use felt tip markers to add lines to the shirt and socks.  I am pleased with how those turned out.

“Come, all you who are thirsty, come to the waters; and you who have no money, come, buy and eat! Come, buy wine and milk without money and without cost.  Isaiah 55:1

“Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.”  Matthew 11:28

Shalom.