re-using, recycling, and redeeming old wood

Posts tagged “cotton wood bark

103 Revisited: Post 83

2012-03-14 05.49.07

Of course, you are asking yourself what this photo is all about.  Well, if you haven’t skipped to the bottom and looked through the gallery yet, it is a mouth full of teeth.  Not my original idea, I found it in one of the myriad of carving magazines lying around my carving space.  This is a final post of a project shown earlier in 83 Big mouth 1 and 2.  This is Big mouth 2 painted.

2012-03-14 05.48.45

I didn’t want to make all the pictures large, but I thought at least these two would make a nice showing, giving the full effect of the piece.  I really like the strong white on the teeth.  It is acrylic white at full strength.  I do like the softer blue for a hint of a hat and the natural red or umber of the unpainted wood for the face.  Every piece teaches something for the next time.  On this piece I would paint the gums a stronger red. Without it, there is some confusion about where the gum is and where the lip begins.  Having said that, the piece is fun.  Anyone interested in buying it?  We can talk.

Shalom,

“Desire without knowledge is not good—how much more will hasty feet miss the way! ” Proverbs 18


97 carving ideas

Image

I am always looking for carving ideas.  Now that I almost always have an iPad with me it is easier to capture some of them quickly.  This photo hangs in a hallway in my Uncle Georg’s house in western Germany.  What caught my attention was the roof lines and the texture the artist shows us.  Having done many roofs, what I note is shapes and shadows.  Also, on the building to the right, my eye is caught by the strong line near the top denoting the final layer of thatch.  The question is then, how can that be replicated in wood.  Which tool works best, what will be the most efficient way to make those cuts.  For anyone who has not carved, part of the issue is the direction ones cut, up from the bottom of the roof or down from the top.  Experimental cuts need to be made to determine what happens to grain wood, how the grain reacts.

https://mail-attachment.googleusercontent.com/attachment/u/0/?ui=2&ik=aefd2a3be1&view=att&th=1410fc050ce5aba9&attid=0.0&disp=inline&safe=1&zw&saduie=AG9B_P804xOy40z7oL9Sw9w_Yg9e&sadet=1378949161007&sads=KuxtYepqPx8_W7FNsW89ksTkw7k

Sorry about the quality of this photo.  However, for my purposes, this is good enough.  What is appealing to me is the roof lines of the buildings, how they sit together, the shadows, and how the artist has created texture.  While the photo is fuzzy, the relationship between the buildings is strong enough to be appealing.  Hope you have some ideas to share.  Or, if you use some ideas from these pictures I would love to see them.

Shalom.

Comfort, comfort my people says your God.  Isaiah 40:1


#20 Carving in the sunshine


Carving a cypress knee in the sunshine

There is no better place to carve than outside in the sunshine, especially with friends.  Two friends, Ed and Jeff, and I spent last Saturday carving in my back yard.  Jeff worked on a cypress knee while Ed and I worked on some bark houses.

Ed carving a cotton wood bark house

Jeff has received  lessons for the cypress knee from another carver so we left him on his own.   He was working on a few of the extra details for the piece.

Ed was making his first attempts at carving houses out of cotton wood bark.  We talked about setting up the piece first.  We looked the bark over for defects, taking off the lose or weak pieces.  Then we drew on the back of the bark to get an idea of how we wanted the house to stand on a hill, the angles of the roof line, walls and hill.  Next we began to rough in the roof, the walls and hill lines.

Ed and Jeff carving 10 9 10

Cotton wood always forces you to deal with weak spots, pieces that fall off or break off in the process of carving.  Ed’s piece had two wings, but one broke off while the piece was being handled.  In the end the carving


Carving cotton wood bark in the sunshine

will actually be stronger as a result of have less wood.  Ed had to figure out how to make the house fit on the rearranged piece.

After roughing in the house and spotting it correctly on the hill the next work was to begin adding windows and doors.  On bark house I tend to make the doors and


Tools of the craft

windows oversized so they are easier to set in and carve.

The tedious work began here.  Roof lines had to  be finally set in and shingles drawn out and carved.  Doors and windows had to be pierced to let light through.  Exterior siding were sketched on and carved in.  Details for the hill, rocks, benches were added at this point in the carving.

Stop cutting Santa's gift bag.

While we did not get the project completed the final steps after details are fixed in place will be to spray the piece with sealer bringing out and preserving  the rich colors of the bark.  And then the piece is ready for signing and dating.  And, as Jeff keeps reminding us, once the piece is signed no more carving on it.

Psalm 19:1
The heavens declare the glory of God; the skies proclaim the work of his hands.


Carving in cottonwood.

 

A different slant on things 1a

 

 

A different slant on things 1b

 

Another carving.  Three  photos to go with our article.  Amazing what one can learn.  Of course, we aren’t saying how long it took.

A DIFFERENT SLANT ON THINGS.

Cottonwood is one of my favorite materials to use.  As you can see, the bark of the cottonwood can be very thick.  The exterior layer is usually gray and dark.  The fun begins when the exterior is open and the grain of the bark is displayed.

 

A different slant on things 1c

 

Rich, deep reds, browns and yellows interplay in pleasing and exciting patterns.  Before finish coats are added the exposed bark is a soft brown, often unremarkable. When a coat of sealer or wax is added cottonwood bark really stands out.

Cottonwood is a pleasing wood to carve.  It is softer than most carving material.  It holds detail nicely.  One drawback is its fragility.  When carving, you always need to be aware of the pressure being put on the various parts of the carving.  Flexibility in design is a must when carving with cottonwood.

This piece is for sale today at a 10% discount on the Gift shop price.  Contact me if you are interested.