re-using, recycling, and redeeming old wood

Posts tagged “cottonwood

103 Revisited: Post 83

2012-03-14 05.49.07

Of course, you are asking yourself what this photo is all about.  Well, if you haven’t skipped to the bottom and looked through the gallery yet, it is a mouth full of teeth.  Not my original idea, I found it in one of the myriad of carving magazines lying around my carving space.  This is a final post of a project shown earlier in 83 Big mouth 1 and 2.  This is Big mouth 2 painted.

2012-03-14 05.48.45

I didn’t want to make all the pictures large, but I thought at least these two would make a nice showing, giving the full effect of the piece.  I really like the strong white on the teeth.  It is acrylic white at full strength.  I do like the softer blue for a hint of a hat and the natural red or umber of the unpainted wood for the face.  Every piece teaches something for the next time.  On this piece I would paint the gums a stronger red. Without it, there is some confusion about where the gum is and where the lip begins.  Having said that, the piece is fun.  Anyone interested in buying it?  We can talk.

Shalom,

“Desire without knowledge is not good—how much more will hasty feet miss the way! ” Proverbs 18

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83 Wood carving: Big Mouth 1 and 2

I have been showing the work of others for the past while. Thought it might be time to show something I have carved.  These two pieces were begun at the end of last summer.  They are now finished and hanging in our house.  The work in progress is shown here.  Will show the painted pieces soon, after I take a few more pictures. The carvings are roughly 18 long x 4 wide x 2 inches thick.

Both carvings are done in cottonwood bark.  Last summer I revisited a lightening struck tree while on a family vacation.  For years small sections or pieces have been falling off the tree.  This past summer the tree’s entire bark skin came off.  The morning we were to return home, while I still had an empty vehicle, I loaded up as much bark as would fit in my small SUV.  I found some storage for the bark and was even able to squeeze a few pieces into the load returning home from vacation.  Good thing we ate our way through some of supplies from the incoming trip. That left room for some bark.

I found inspiration for the pieces in a carving magazine.  One picture gave the idea.  The challenge was to get the correct cuts to recreate feeling of the photo.  My dentist liked the pieces.  Perhaps I will have to replace the bad spot in Big Mouth 1 with a gold filling.

Enjoy.  Feed back is most welcome.  Inquiries about purchasing pieces also.

“If a ruler listens to lies, all his officials become wicked.”  Proverbs 29:12


#73 Wood carving: Cotton wood bark church with a “tree.”

Bark church with “tree”

I still like carving cotton wood bark.  It is always a joy to see what appears from underneath the gray skin.  It is also a great challenge to see how much of the original outer bark can be preserved and make something out of the rest of the piece.

The little church in the pine forest.

The intent for the piece had been to put in the church and then create a tree long the right side.  I completed the church first, in case I broke too much of the door or too much on the windows I wouldn’t have “wasted time on the tree.  After having finished the church I began setting in the tree.  But as you can see, the tree is as finished as it will get.  Once the top of the tree was put in place and the outside edge cleaned I stepped back and noticed how the gray bark reminded me of pine trees seen in the moonlight or semi-dark of a north Wisconsin forest.  So, the tree was “finished.”  I like the effect.

Good view of front door and side bench.

I like how the details on this carving stand out.  The block of the walls add some nice high-lights. Their size also seems to work well with the over-all piece.  The bench is eye-catching.  The shape invites one to come aside for a time and rest a while.  The stairs came out rather nicely, given the struggle to work around the crack along the right side of the platform.

Happily this piece is sold.  If you would like one like it, please do contact me here.  I have several more churches in stock, some simpler and some much more complex.  See post #66.  Thanks for looking.

“One who has unreliable friends soon comes to ruin,  but there is a friend who sticks closer than a brother”  Proverbs 18:24


#58 Penguins, penguins, penguins: Coffman style.

White pine penguin -sold

A few snow days and some quiet hours have given me time to carve a small waddle of penguins. Check me out, the term is correct, when they are on land anyway. When they are in the water you call them a raft of penguins. And if they are chicks standing around in a group you have a creche (kresh) of penguins.

White pine 2

white pine 3

Basswood mini

The penguins shown here have been carved in several different types of wood. The first few photos here are a carving out of white pine.  Several things to like about this one, I think.  You don’t have smell on your computer, but the wood has a great aroma.  Also, I really like the grain and the effect it has on the piece.  And one more feature I like about this carving, the blank was cut out of a piece of white pine splintered off a log.  The block of wood was about three inches square.  The carving still has some of the rough edges on the piece.  I like the effect.

Cottonwood bark 1

Cottonwood bark 2

Cottonwood bark 3

One of my favorite materials for carving is cottonwood.  I really like the effect of the rich, dark red coloring of this penguin.  It also looks good on the uncut bark, giving the wood a “rock-like” appearance.

Butternut 2

Butternut 1

Basswood mini 2

This little guy is my daughter’s favorite.  He is done in butternut.  His plumb little body leans into you.  He has a cute charm.

Basswood, leaning into wind

Basswood, leaning into the wind

Basswood, leaning into the wind 3

The piece, like the mini, is out of basswood.  Basswood is one of the favorite materials for American wood carvers.  This piece is an attempt at creating tension and movement.  The uphill climb is real.

A basswood pair.

A basswood pair 2

Another white pine carving

The final two pictures are of small piece done in cedar.  The smell is great and the colors add a nice touch to the carving.

Red cedar 1

Red cedar 2

Those who disregard discipline despise themselves, but the one who heeds correction gains understanding. Proverbs 15:32


#33 Wood Carving: Cottonwood Bark – The Water Barrel

 

Bark house - the water barrel

Bark houses are a delight to carve.  The colors, contrasts, and creative opportunities make carving cottonwood bark a great medium.

The Water Barrel – stairs and bench

Following the flow of the bark is one key to making a pleasing looking bark carving.  In “The Water Barrel,”  one interesting feature was a large wing of wood plunging off to the left.  One method I have used to enhance such a piece is to pierce the wood under the house to allow light through.  In this carving, I chose to add rocks, stairs and a bench.  The shadows under the bench, created by the stairs and the rocks add visual interest.  I like how the outer skin of the bark which has been left on the carving draws the eye up to the house.

The Water Barrel – Front door and wall

 

 

 

Bark carving is both interesting and challenging.  This can be seen in the view of the front door and wall.  The door ended up being recessed because of the fault lines running through the piece.  At the same time those fault lines needed to be kept visible to add more interest to the piece.  Because of the faults the surface finish chosen was block or “stone” rather than clapboard.  This allowed for working around the faults.

Details can be added at any time in the carving.  However, some details need to be anticipated.  The water barrel in this carving was planned for.

Side view of bench and stairs

The sides of the house, both the bench and the barrel, needed extra wood.  In the rough out stage, the house was not completed to the base so that these details could be added in toward completion.

The same planning needed to go into the chimney.  Wood needs to be left on the roof anticipating where the chimney may go.  Position the chimney where it will add to the over-all design of the piece.

Chimney detail

Rocks and piercing on “The Water Barrel”

Even though much of the base wood has been left, some piercing has added to the eye appeal of this carving.  Note the contrast created by the light, rust colored inner wood and the skin gray.  I find this one of the most appealing features of bark carving.

The Water Barrel – the back

One more picture.  When carving bark and doing a lot of piercings, the view from the back of the carving can be nearly as interesting as the front.

One more comment on this post.  Did you notice the quality change in the photos?  I love wood carving.  Not so adept at picture taking.  Learning as I go.  The early photos were taken in the basement under indoor lighting.  The pictures at the end were taken in the sunlight.  I needed a better picture of the barrel.  Of course, that means I should take all my photos in the sunlight.  And that means I would need to commandeer not only the entire basement, the whole garage, but also a corner of the living room where we find the best sunlight.  Hmmmm.  may be plan B.  Until next time. Shalom.

“The night is nearly over; the day is almost here. So let us put aside the deeds of darkness and put on the armor of light .” Romans 13:12


#28 Wood carving: Cotton wood bark houses and buildings

One of the joys I have in carving is cottonwood bark. The bark of the cottonwood tree is a delightful carving medium.

Bark house 11 14 10 a

It can grow up to six inches thick on certain Plains trees.  Most of the bark I work with is from two to four inches thick.

Bark house 11 14 10 b

Another great feature of the bark is its color.  The outer part comes in many shades of gray, maybe black or I have even found pieces that have been bleached white by the sun and other conditions.  The exterior coloring is also varied by the amount of moss or lichen which may cover the piece.  While there is great coloration on the exterior, the interior coloring always takes my breath away.  Tones of color from rich, deep reds to light browns and even yellows make cutting into any piece an adventure.

Bark house 11 14 10 c

In the next months I will post many more bark carvings,

Bark house 11 14 10 d

take note of the color variations.  Added to the coloring is the growth layer variations which are exposed in different ways with each new cut.  If you have not, let me encourage you to pick up a piece of cottonwood bark and give it a try.

Bark house 11 14 10 e


Shout for joy to the LORD, all the earth, burst into jubilant song with music…  Psalm 98:4