re-using, recycling, and redeeming old wood

Posts tagged “hand carved

Video

104 Woodcarving An Eagle Head

Jim Redhawk demonstrates how to carve an eagle head from a cottonwood blank. My version posted here as soon as I get photos to share. Enjoy Redhawk’s lesson until then. Shalom.

“…but those who hope in the Lord will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles;
they will run and not grow weary, they will walk and not be faint.”


103 Revisited: Post 83

2012-03-14 05.49.07

Of course, you are asking yourself what this photo is all about.  Well, if you haven’t skipped to the bottom and looked through the gallery yet, it is a mouth full of teeth.  Not my original idea, I found it in one of the myriad of carving magazines lying around my carving space.  This is a final post of a project shown earlier in 83 Big mouth 1 and 2.  This is Big mouth 2 painted.

2012-03-14 05.48.45

I didn’t want to make all the pictures large, but I thought at least these two would make a nice showing, giving the full effect of the piece.  I really like the strong white on the teeth.  It is acrylic white at full strength.  I do like the softer blue for a hint of a hat and the natural red or umber of the unpainted wood for the face.  Every piece teaches something for the next time.  On this piece I would paint the gums a stronger red. Without it, there is some confusion about where the gum is and where the lip begins.  Having said that, the piece is fun.  Anyone interested in buying it?  We can talk.

Shalom,

“Desire without knowledge is not good—how much more will hasty feet miss the way! ” Proverbs 18


101 So much wood, so little time: Sequoia National Park

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I just have to share a few photos of the Sequoias of California.  It was a privilege and a blessing to walk among these great trees, grateful for their preservation and their beauty.  I am only half joking about carving them.  It would be grand to get some of this wood.  I do carve cotton wood bark, so I had gone to the park hoping to be able to find a piece of Sequoia bark.  After being there and touching one of the tree, I know better.  The bark of these giants is spongy, made up of many small scales or flakes.  I suspect it would not make a good base for a carving.

2012-06-23 14.39.07

It is difficult to imagine trees this large, and then to imagine how much wood is in one.  Not that I am in favor of cutting any of this beauties down, but, wow.  I must say that, while the pictures are stunning, being in their presences is even better.

Shalom.

“Starting a quarrel is like breaching a dam;so drop the matter before a dispute breaks out.”


100 Carvings ideas: China

2012-08-01 21.03.10

The pieces shown here are not done in wood.  They are all clay.  Home to them is a beautiful new museum in Tianjin, China.  So what are these photos doing in a wood blog?  Ideas, ideas, ideas.  I love looking at how artists take the real world and make it in….you name it…clay, glass, plastic, fruit, yarn, paint, pencil, steel, junk, wire, string, paper, cloth.  The variety is amazing, the talent, the creativity, stunning.   The main character here has so many great details.  Notice the tilt of his hat and the curl of the bill.  No American teen could do it better.  The shoes, both the one being repaired and his own, also have neat detail – thick soles, the kink of the leather, the stitching on his own, no laces.  A wood carver could learn much from the angles of the limbs, head, and body.  The fine details in the clothing – marks to indicate shadow or create shadow.  And, we haven’t even begun to look at the two characters in the background.  Enjoy.  Would you share what details you find interesting in the others?

Shalom.

A gentle answer turns away wrath,but a harsh word stirs up anger.  Proverbs 15:1


99 A place to put a roof.

In a previous post, 96, I shared two pictures from my Uncle’s house, pictures of old fashioned roof lines on old fashioned houses.  Here is one of the houses I have worked on.  The thatched roof has a mountain home feel.  The doors work well, even though they aren’t t he same.  After it was completed I thought perhaps I should have put bigger windows on the back side.  What do you think?  I really like the shadows the deep cuts make in the base.  The next carving has more details on the porch.  Each carving brings ideas for the next.  I would value seeing some of your carvings.  Care to share?

Shalom.

Go to the ant, you sluggard;consider its ways and be wise!  It has no commander, no overseer or ruler, yet it stores its provisions in summerand gathers its food at harvest.  Proverbs 6: 6,7,8


97 carving ideas

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I am always looking for carving ideas.  Now that I almost always have an iPad with me it is easier to capture some of them quickly.  This photo hangs in a hallway in my Uncle Georg’s house in western Germany.  What caught my attention was the roof lines and the texture the artist shows us.  Having done many roofs, what I note is shapes and shadows.  Also, on the building to the right, my eye is caught by the strong line near the top denoting the final layer of thatch.  The question is then, how can that be replicated in wood.  Which tool works best, what will be the most efficient way to make those cuts.  For anyone who has not carved, part of the issue is the direction ones cut, up from the bottom of the roof or down from the top.  Experimental cuts need to be made to determine what happens to grain wood, how the grain reacts.

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Sorry about the quality of this photo.  However, for my purposes, this is good enough.  What is appealing to me is the roof lines of the buildings, how they sit together, the shadows, and how the artist has created texture.  While the photo is fuzzy, the relationship between the buildings is strong enough to be appealing.  Hope you have some ideas to share.  Or, if you use some ideas from these pictures I would love to see them.

Shalom.

Comfort, comfort my people says your God.  Isaiah 40:1


96 Gifts to friends part one

Golfer 26 2013

“The Retired Golfer”  in the collection of Mr. Ron Holwerda

One of the great joys of wood carving is the opportunity to share carvings with others.  Last June two of my good friends and colleagues retired from teaching.  Ron was my principal and Milt was the teacher in the room next door to me.  I worked with them for 21 years.  We had a great working relationship.  And we got to know each other.

Golf is one of Ron’s passions.  I am sure he can find time for a few rounds now.  So it seemed appropriate to carve a golfer.  The design is not my own, the workmanship is.  I included a bunch of thumbnail views so you would get the full effect.  I am curious to know how well they show  up for you.  It is the first time I have used the thumbnail feature.

The figure is bass wood.  The base is a cutoff from a black walnut branch.  Acrylic paint and boiled linseed oil are the main part of the finish.  I learned from Tom Wolfe to use felt tip markers to add lines to the shirt and socks.  I am pleased with how those turned out.

“Come, all you who are thirsty, come to the waters; and you who have no money, come, buy and eat! Come, buy wine and milk without money and without cost.  Isaiah 55:1

“Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.”  Matthew 11:28

Shalom.