re-using, recycling, and redeeming old wood

Posts tagged “wood working

166. Woodwork from other places, China. Qîngzuò. Please sit down.

I know, it isn’t really wood carving. But, there is wood work done. This stool is more than 150 years old. It captures my attention for several reasons. First is the hand labor involved. Rounding the seat must have taken some time. Shaping the legs as well. Did you notice the slight curve to them. A nice detail. And then there is the work done to slot the legs into the seat, terrific.

A second reason to like this piece is the recycling done. The owner believes the seat was a wheel of some kind, hence the square hole in the top. The seat reminds me of ancient Chinese coins with their square or round holes so they could be threaded and carried on a string.

A third reason to like this stool is the character of the wood. Holes, unfinished edges, color, cracks, and growth rings make this an eye-pleasing object. What do you think?

Shalom.

“Those who are kind benefit themselves, but the cruel bring ruin on themselves.” Prov 11:17

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149 Woodworking Safety. Toxic Wood.

If you are, have been, or plan to be a wood carver or wood worker, below is a site worth a little of your time. All sawdust is not just sawdust.

We have learned to protect our eyes (you do wear googles, right?) and our hands, (you do wear carving gloves or some finger covering, no?). But what about your lungs? Learn about wood, its properties, its dangers. Take care. Or as they say in China, man zou.

http://blog.woodturnerscatalog.com/2012/08/toxic-woods/

Shalom.

“Do not wear yourself out to get rich; do not trust your own cleverness.” Prov 23:4


137. Woodwork from other places 11, China. Let it snow, let it snow.

Remember the extra picture in Post 131? Did you guess correctly? It is a Chinese snow sled. I love the joints and the obvious wear and tear. However, I am not sure about its stability. Seems to be made only for a smaller child. And I am also wondering where the rope is. Would grandpa have to carry it?

Hope you have some good memories of play in the snow. Shalom.


106 Rustic church on a Hill

How does you critique or evaluate a carving, especially your own? One thing to try is to ask questions. Another is to make observations. So, here is one of my pieces. First question, do the textures seen in this view work together?

A second question, do the colors compete or support each other?

One could also ask, is the flow or movement in the piece?

An observation is that the church seems to fit the piece of wood, neither too large or too small for it. If the rule is thirds, then the church is about one third, stairs one third, and rocks one third.

Another observation is to note the repeat of color, red steps and red in the windows, brown cross and trim, around the windows, and in wood work. Perhaps there could have been some yellow lower down or in and open window to tie in the roof.

For some reason the cross titled to the side seems to work. It adds some movement to the entire piece. What do you think?

I know it has been a while since posting, but as you can see, carving continues. Hope yours has too.

“The Lord is my shepherd, I lack nothing. He makes me lie down in green pastures,

he leads me beside quiet waters, he refreshes my soul.” Ps 23


84 Wood carving: Table in Changsha, Hunan, China

I begin this post with an apology to my good friend Alan(wdm)  In a conversation with Alan this morning on QQ I invited him to look on the blog for a few pictures of a table in the Post Office of the school campus where we shared a few summers.  This afternoon I come to my Dashboard and, horror of horrors, I find that I have only begun to set up the next post, haven’t finished it, let alone posted it.

Alan, sorry, here is the table I mentioned.  Do you remember seeing it.  Alina is the young lady in one of the pictures.  Perhaps you saw her when we were walking through the classrooms.

There, enough.  Let’s move on.  Can’t you imagine having a formal dinner around such a wonderful piece?  Or even an informal gathering with the table filled with munchies and drinks.  But of course you will have to to Central South University of Forestry & Technology in order to enjoy it.

One of the great things about travel, for wood carvers, is the opportunity to see new wood carvings. One can only imagine the effort it took to trim and prepare this piece, to work it, and then to get it into place.  The pictures rarely do a piece justice, at least my pictures, but this was an enjoyable find.  Have you any interesting carving photos from any travels you have done?  Would love to see them.

A man may be theologically knowing and spiritually ignorant. —Stephen Charnock

79 Other wood – recycled: Boxes by Rick Klompmaker

Wood is so fascinating.  And what one is able to do with it is equally so.  The pictures are of a box my brother Rick made.  The back story is fun, the box is outstanding.

Yew box by Rick Klompmaker

I love to collect wood as well as carve it.  It drives my family crazy, but I am always on the look out for an interesting chunk of wood.  Our car just stops at random places along the road – farm fields, construction sites, garbage piles, curb trash, and others.

Several years back I was driving to work when I noticed that a good friend of mine had cut down a large decorative “shrub.”   The yew had been allowed to grow to twenty five or thirty feet high with a base of nearly 24 inches.  The branches and stem were piled on the curb.  I was late for school, but could not pass by without checking out the quality of the wood being trashed.  I could not get the entire tree into the car, and my family thanks me.  I was, however, able to save two five foot sections.  These sat in my garage for at least two years.

Original basket weave design

Last summer, while cleaning out the garage, I made a commitment to getting the logs to my brother.  He accepted the wood and promised to make something from it.  You see in the pictures here in the outstanding piece he produced.

Owned by Mr./Mrs. R Smits

This box now resides in the home of  Mr. and Mrs. R Smits, my good friends.  They were the ones who redecorated their yard, necessitating the yew be removed.  Only fitting that they should enjoy one small piece of the tree which they raised for so many years.

If you have a picture of a box or recycled wood piece, please share.  If you have any questions about other pieces Rick Klompmaker has produced, let me know.

“Open my eyes that I may see wonderful things in your law (Bible).”  Psalm 119:18


#69 Other wood: Walnut and butternut art by Rick Klompmaker

Walnut and butternut art

Some times a craftsman has to branch out.  He leaves his usual work behind or sets it aside to try something different.  His roots are still in his original love and craft, but something new beckons.  Even is other bark at him, he has to see what will come as a result of the new idea.

Close up 1

The kernel or bud of the idea takes shape in his mind.  He plants the idea on paper or in clay.  He grows the idea in his mind.  He tries all different shades of the idea.

Close up 2

Finally, his efforts bear fruit in a new project, a new technique, a new direction for his work, even though some friends and family might think he’s nuts.

Thing 1

Sometimes the idea turns into something really unique and pleasing, while other times he takes it out the garage to hide it or he sticks it into his car trunk to be disposed of elsewhere.

Original wood sculpture - Rick Klompmaker, artist

I really like the feeling of this piece.  There are two different woods here, black walnut and butternut.  But Rick has used different portions of the tree, heart wood, solid growth and sap wood.  He even has some spalted walnut adding color to the piece.  Another feature to enjoy in the piece, difficult to see in the photos, is the texture on the different parts of the work – rough cut, sanded, chiseled.  The shapes, both positive and negative, give a great look to this work.  Nice job, Rick.

“The tongue has the power of life and death, and those who love it will eat its fruit.”  Proverbs 18:21